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Can anyone explain it?

Discussion in 'Economics, Business, and Taxes' started by Richard Hammond, Sep 21, 2012.

  1. Days

    Days Governor

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    thx gaffer, I'll keep my eye on it.
     
  2. NightSwimmer

    NightSwimmer Senator

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    Damn Gaff,

    You're a pretty good salesman. I can see why they called you back out of retirement. ;)
     
  3. NightSwimmer

    NightSwimmer Senator

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    Richard,

    I'm not attempting to project my own views onto society. I'm merely telling you what I have objectively observed. I have no motive for being dishonest. I am personally supportive of smaller, more fuel efficient vehicles, but I'm also a realist.
     
  4. degsme

    degsme Council Member

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    Still extrapolating from YOUR PERSONAL experience. i seriously doubt you've polled every gas station in Columbus and Louisville. And since Petro companies set gas prices and product mixes on a BLOCK BY BLOCK basis, your claim just isn't believable.
     
  5. degsme

    degsme Council Member

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    No they aren't. Many FEEL broke. but "many" is not the MAJORITY. Furthermore those that FEEL broke - are not going to buy a new car. Whcih means that the very market you claim would drive buying NEW high milage cars, is the market that is NOT BUYING new cars.

    They ALREADY ARE THERE and are NOT "flying off the show room floors" except in the AFFLUENT areas where they are purchased for SOCIAL STATUS.

    RIGHHHTT... Do tell how "big oil" is preventing this...

    Getting popcorn... this will be good
     
  6. degsme

    degsme Council Member

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    All are DIESEL Hybrids.

    Diesel does not sell well in the USA.

    Ty buying a Ford F150 Pickup in Europe. or a GMC Suburban... they aren't there. Different markets, different product MIXES... doesn't mean that one has "more choices" than the other.

    US Car ownership is 828/1000 polp. Of 310 million popl that's about 256 million units
    EU ownership is about 1/2 that 473 cars/thousand popl but has 731 mil in the Greater Europe For about 350 mil units.

    so you will have similar number of DIFFERENt vehicles.

    Your point is not a meaningful one - other than to say... different markets, different product mixes.
     
  7. TaiPan

    TaiPan Council Member

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    The car you are talking about is a Volkswagon Diesel and the reason it isn't sold here is simple, it doesn't meet the EPA Clean Air Standards at this time. Giving Volkswagon credit for its engineering, no doubt some day it will. The Jetta and Passat TDIs sold here already reach 35+mpg, a friend has one that is @ 5yrs old that routinely gets 40+ mpg on the road. The technology is there, the vehicles are there, it truly is a matter of changing the what that we buy that will make the difference in the marketplace. IF companies can't sell it, they quit making it.

    I won't try to predict when cars with the ability to get 75 mpg will hit the US market, but sooner or later they will. One of the real problems is that some people who can count have figured out that the average cost of gasoline today, adjusted for inflation is actually a bit less than it was before the 1st Arab oil embargo, back in Nixon's day - less than $1.00 per gal. Inflation has been about 420% +/- during the same period, and the value of that 1968 was a hell of a lot more than a dollar today. If you balance it all out, in terms of 1968 dollars, I seem to recall the actual cost per gal is somewhere around 76-92 cents per gal. Compare that to the cost of a candy bar which has risen on average 1200% over the same time frame.

    In any case that's another side of the story on supra fuel efficient engines, and gas prices. Remember the revolution after the 1st Arab Embargo and the change in direction for the US Auto Market that bankrupted Chrysler and thew GM and & Ford into a tailspin. Imports with higher mileage numbers took a giant share of the US market. The next round of efficiency will have a similar effect, as ultimately will natural gas, hydrogen and electric powered cars.

    Tai Pan
     

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