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My kid's best friend

Discussion in 'PJ Post Hall of Fame!' started by Days, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. JackDallas

    JackDallas Senator Supporting Member

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    You've provided too much information. I just don't have time to engage it all.
     
  2. Days

    Days Governor

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    Thanks Jack, you've already been more engaged than I expected from anyone. All I'm doing here is sharing my excitement over acquiring a product line for a proposed corporation. Any entrepreneur would understand.

    I mailed that model chart this morning, then came home and realized that I have actual models now, so I need to name them. Soooooooooo, in reverence to Henry Ford and all classic beginnings, I have given the 3 models their own names...

    upload_2018-6-2_13-49-52.
     
  3. JackDallas

    JackDallas Senator Supporting Member

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    Don't get me wrong, it's all very interesting but I just don't have the time to reset my brain. I'm in the process of going over the edits of my next book from my publisher which comes out in paperback in July. I have a mission trip at the end of June and i'm working on a new book, all at the same time. My brain is at 120% now. There is no more room left.
     
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  4. Days

    Days Governor

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    I hear ya! What is the name of the new book that is coming out in July?
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2018
  5. JackDallas

    JackDallas Senator Supporting Member

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    I'll PM you with that Info.
     
  6. Days

    Days Governor

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    finally got some time off to work on my hoist...

    check out the completed product line:


    upload_2018-6-4_15-37-20.


    here's the speed and run time chart on Model D (I definitely do not expect to see this model built in my lifetime)...

    this chart picks up where the 3" drum rim model left off:


    upload_2018-6-4_15-40-32.
     
  7. JackDallas

    JackDallas Senator Supporting Member

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    It's all geek to me.
     
  8. Days

    Days Governor

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    you know, 2 of my 3 brothers have the degrees in electrical, the other one has a MBA... no man builds a corporation alone, but this immediate family has built a half dozen corps already. I appreciated the heads up that the solar panel would be pushing AC at the power controls, so we will need to convert that to a DC recharge for the batteries. I am hoping to drop those headaches on my brother... but I make sure the technology is available before I incorporate it into my design. I've done a lot of commercial electrical work myself, but I have no experience with DC... although those are my initials DC, and funny enough, the brother I'm hoping wants to jump onboard and do the electrical for me; his initials are AC. We was just born to do this hoist, that's how I see it. But there's a lot of good reasons to not want to do this idea; I understand that, it would be downright strange if both brothers and my friend were all to say, "I'm in"... especially seeing as they are all in their low to mid 60's, with families to look after. That's life.
     
  9. Days

    Days Governor

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    I kicked Model C out of the line up ...
     
  10. Days

    Days Governor

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  11. Days

    Days Governor

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    ... and fixed the 7/16" hoist...
     
  12. Days

    Days Governor

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    upload_2018-6-5_15-21-28.

    Model B: this is a 1000 meter hoist with 6" drum rims; it wraps 13 levels of 7/16" wire rope. I do the same hoist with 3/8" wire rope for Model D.
     

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  13. Days

    Days Governor

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    So, I finally ended up with just one hoist; what will I do with all those copies I made of that cool looking chart for hoist models?

    this is the final choice:
     
  14. Days

    Days Governor

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    upload_2018-6-11_17-37-28.
     

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  15. Days

    Days Governor

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    All summer I've been working on the frame and brake of the final model, until the tweaks I made this weekend has brought a final, final, final hoist design into view. I haven't even mailed the tweaks out yet, but I updated my description, which I have held back from publishing until I knew it was current with a final design. I ended up with the 3/4 mile reach hoist, which was always my favorite. Here's the speed and run time chart for it and the description that accompanies the investment opportunity...


    upload_2018-8-5_12-54-42.




    The Hoist and Davit


    This is the first scaffold hoist specifically designed for super tall buildings. Conventional scaffold hoists are not suited to the performance demands of the 1200 foot + environment, if our industry is going to gain access to the exterior of super tall buildings, we must enter a whole new paradigm of hoist performance. This hoist is a battery driven gearmotor hoist that employs two 60 Volt DC motor/ generators working in tandem behind air cooled planetary gearing. It is a much larger scaffold hoist than the world has ever seen, the hoist is 8 feet tall, 5 feet wide, and 4 feet deep, mostly constructed from titanium. The hoist weighs roughly 2600 pounds. The gear motor wraps a maximum 1207 meters of 7/16” wire rope onto a 15” diameter drum located underneath the stage, giving the hoist a max reach of 3960 feet (3/4 mile). The frame suspends a wire rope drum tube between two motor housing tubes, sending power through two gearings that meet in the center of the drum tube. The gearing provides a 3600:1 torque reduction for both motors, making the hoist extremely powerful. 1400 RPM motors engage inline gearing that provide 100% throughput to the drum. The 150:1 gear ratio turns the drum at 9 1/3 RPM … resulting in a base wrap that climbs 36 ½ feet per minute, and a run time of 5 minutes, 20 seconds per level. Drum capacity is 15 levels of wire rope.


    There is no AC on this hoist. A total of 4 cubic feet of battery provides a large reservoir of power for a system that is constantly receiving and using a small flow of voltage. Two lithium polymer batteries are recharged by a 12” x 16” solar panel located on the roof of the hoist. A laser is fastened on the end of the davit boom and aimed directly down at the solar panel. Since the batteries are onboard, there is no way to lose power, but if the laser fails, there should be sufficient charge in the batteries to climb to the roof. The laser runs on the building’s power feed to the roof, the laser converts that power source to light, which the solar panel then converts back to electricity; hence, the hoist batteries are recharged in use, and the DC power controls maintain the battery charge level at 95%. The idea is to take advantage of lithium polymer batteries being very good at discharge and recharge. In essence, the laser does the job of an electric cord… it feeds power to the stage, only it does it wireless.


    There are no load-free lines such as an electric cord or nylon/polyurethane rope, the wire rope load line is the sole line on each end of the stage; this is crucial when scaling thousands of feet. Guard rail is structural; the operator can tie off to the back rail, while the pick is secured to the front guard rail. The hoist is balancing a front side and a back side, by positioning a heavy ballast in the bottom middle. The front two-foot work area is completely unobstructed, while the back side of the hoist has the fairlead, spreader, drum guide, batteries, power controls, and solar panel. The load line enters the fairlead 7” behind the stage. The load line is captured by tension rollers in the upper fairlead, which then feed a swivel sheave in the lower fairlead, the fairlead swivel sheave turns freely as does the spreader trolley it feeds, both are controlled by the drum guide trolley they feed, and the drum guide trolley is geared to the drum. With over 6 vertical feet from the tension rollers in the upper fairlead to the capture of the wire rope on the drum, this hoist takes platform stability to a whole new level, the hoist is also balanced from left to right and front to back. Below the stage, located on the upper and lower levels of frame, there are two 6” diameter x 26” rollers. The spreader is a precision spreader, there is absolutely zero pull to any point on the drum by the wire rope being under load. There are no electrical controls to the wire rope guide… it is solely an interaction of mechanical gears… impossible to fail. When the drum reverses direction, so does the guide; if the drum wrap hits the rim and heads back the other direction, so does the guide… the drum turns everything, the gears only turn if the drum turns.


    Down direction is power off, pushing the pendant down button only releases the brakes… the hoist then free falls, gravity runs the down direction. The DC motor/generator recharges the battery in down direction. The drum will stop turning the moment the hoist sets down, and the wire rope remains taut with the tension rollers in the upper fairlead at all times. The drum is braked on each end by 2 giant friction brakes: with over 311 square inches of braking area, they require 11 pounds, 9 oz per square inch to stop 3600 pounds. Springs, seated in the frame, make the brake always on, the springs are accompanied by solenoids that hold off the brake when moving. The brake takes the entire load directly, while the gearing and the generator constantly limit the drum rotation to 9 1/3 RPM, making the brake system extremely powerful.


    I designed a davit roof truck that can suspend this hoist over the side and clear any size wall. The davit is really an electric crane. The 5 feet x 7 ½ feet davit truck supports a mast of 3 stages that fit inside each other, and a boom that swivels on top. The truck, mast, and boom weigh about 7 tons, and then there is boom counter weight of an additional 3 tons, so all total, 10 tons. The davit truck is also counterweight for the boom; when a drop site is chosen, the davit is jacked in the four corners, the hoist and boom counterweight are lifted (simultaneously), then the boom swivels on the mast and the stage is swung over the wall, then the boom ties back to the roof truck, there’s no need to tie down the truck to the building. The proper boom counter weight will be provided for stage weight and payload; the boom stays in balance, even at 500 pounds over the optimum working payload. A traction hoist and 2 pulleys, rigged to the boom counter weight, lift the mast into place, and then lift the boom counter weight, suspended from two pulleys on the back of the boom. Two men should be to set up the mast, collapse the mast, and handle moves between drops. A pavement needs to be provided for the davit truck.


    It is temporary staging, custom built to work for each building. It is nearly zero maintenance, rugged equipment that will last as long as the building it is built for. It is high performance equipment, the stage is extremely stable, fast, and the wire rope guide wraps so accurate, the wire rope should last a decade between changes. It is a powerful hoist, with a heavy duty super structure, that can handle heavy use as well as heavy projects. And it is wireless technology, onboard power, that puts full control of movement in the hands of the men on the stage.
     
  16. Days

    Days Governor

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    The drum needs 3 lays of wire rope before it can start to pick a load. I just caught a mistake in the description; I put the reach of the hoist for the drum capacity. Actually, the drum wraps a maximum 1212 meters of wire rope, which gives the hoist a max reach of 3960 feet (1207 meters).

    The tallest roof in the world is 2100 feet high... the Jeddah Tower roof should top out around 2300 feet high this year, the next five years of construction is banging up a half dozen super tall buildings in the 2100 - 2500 foot range. So, this hoist is way out in front of the curve. But if we get it on market, someone will design a 3/4 mile high roof; architects are fearless.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2018
  17. Days

    Days Governor

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    Spoiler Alert!

    The drum rims are 6 3/4" tall, but they are rounded to 6 9/16". There is a physical 7 1/2" of space between the drum tube and the deck overhead as well as the caster plate underneath. What that means is, there is room in this design to push the drum rims out to 7 3/8", which would allow for 2 more levels of wire rope. I would only build that if someone built a roof higher than 3/4 mile... probably not going to happen in my lifetime. But there is room in the design to go to 16 levels of wire rope (4300 feet reach) and if they needed it, the same design could cram 17 levels of wire rope on the drum. 17 levels would reach 4650 feet.

    I didn't want to leave the impression that some architect could build a 4000 foot roof and own that perch as tallest roof indefinitely... this hoist can go higher, there's just no reason to put on 7" rims or 7 3/8" rims for the current market. That might happen someday... or not, who knows?
     

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