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My kid's best friend

Discussion in 'PJ Post Hall of Fame!' started by Days, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. The Sage of Main Street

    The Sage of Main Street Governor

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    Europe Sent Its Best to Marginalize the World's Worst

    I'm referring to nationalist settler colonialism, not the Left/Right New World Order. As what used to be done in America, those who had been left out at home should evict the natives and show what they can do when not squashed by the heiristocracy.
     
  2. Days

    Days Governor

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    meanwhile, one day in the evolution of scaffold hoist design....

    A turning point was reached...

    this went out today:




    February 25, 2019


    Dear Harold, Mike, and Al,

    Going to the 30” frame and the 20” diameter drum stop gear and the 10” diameter 2nd guide gear enlarged the hoist in ways I did not expect. The tracks are now resting fully on the mainframe, where I always wanted them, and there’s plenty of clearance from the guide trolley sheave to the drum. But especially, moving the moorings for the worm gears to the vertical solar panel frame plate made it possible to change wire rope sizes in the field. These are no longer “hoist models” … this is now, one hoist, that can adapt to 10 different size wire ropes.

    So, I’ve got to change the description again, to reflect the hoist that has emerged. The Hoist Description is written to the prospective ground floor investor, but it could also be used to advertise/market the hoist … that’s Harold’s call. I will mail the updated description with my next letter on the hoist.

    So, you know…

    • ' the 12 mm wire rope has a 1180-meter reach (3870 feet).
    • · The 7/16” wire rope has a 1300-meter reach (4265 feet)
    To go that high, the safety factor on the wire rope would be 5:1. Unless, that is, if it turns out 12 mm titanium wire rope is strong enough to keep it at 6:1, but I’m sure the 7/16” wire rope would be at 5:1. That’s why I wasn’t going to change the description, but then I realized that I have to describe the hoist differently than calling the different sizes of wire rope “models”… it is no longer a model, this is now a feature, the hoist can handle 10 different sizes of wire rope, that’s a feature of this singular model.

    There are still more features of the hoist and the davit that I haven’t gotten to yet. The brake pad now loads in front of the drum stop. To change the brake pad, pull the first guide gear, unbolt and slide back the drum stop, then unbolt and change out the pad; I haven’t decided if the brake pad (and its retainer plate) should be 3 pieces or 4. I still think the brake pad will last 10,000 years, but it has to be serviceable. Everything is designed to be serviceable; I think about how the parts can be easily removed and replaced, I try to make it all as simple as possible.

    Love, Damian
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2019
  3. Winston

    Winston Do you feel lucky, Punk

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    Ran out of the meds huh?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Days

    Days Governor

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    What do you get when you cross three penguins with a high tar cigarette?

    3 angry penguins
     
  5. Winston

    Winston Do you feel lucky, Punk

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    You write 400 chapters about something meaningless then continue about smoking penguins...…………..……..

    There are all night pharmacies you know
     
  6. Days

    Days Governor

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    which "something meaningless" are you referring to?
     
  7. Winston

    Winston Do you feel lucky, Punk

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    Dude there is nothing meaningful about your imaginary smoking penguins. Something meaningless is the description of everything you write.

    Yo, you find proof of 25 feet tall people yet
     
  8. Days

    Days Governor

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    Winston = a high tar cigarette

    trolling my writings in PJ hall of fame = crossing my avatar = pissing me off.

    get it? now get lost
     
  9. Winston

    Winston Do you feel lucky, Punk

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    Am I interrupting your delusion?
     
  10. Days

    Days Governor

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    to put it mildly.

    My family was the largest manufacturer of permanent installation window washing equipment in the western hemisphere. That was more than a delusion, my friend, that was my career. I was the finest field service technician on the planet. I built the largest maintenance service program in the nation and helped define our codes and laws and spread a much greater understanding of rigging. Saved a lot of lives.

    Who the hell are you to come along and slander my life and call my writings delusions? You don't know me, you are some idiotic internet troll. Keep it up and I'll get you banned, you won't be the first.
     
  11. Days

    Days Governor

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    the updated Hoist and Davit description:



    The Hoist and Davit


    This is the first scaffold hoist specifically designed for super tall buildings. Conventional scaffold hoists are not suited to the performance demands of the 1200 foot + environment, if our industry is going to gain access to the exterior of super tall buildings, we must enter a whole new paradigm of hoist performance. This hoist is a battery driven gearmotor hoist that employs two 60 Volt DC motor/ generators working in tandem behind air cooled planetary gearing. It is a much larger scaffold hoist than the world has ever seen, the hoist is 8 ½ feet tall, 5 feet wide, and 4 feet deep, constructed entirely from titanium. The hoist employs a 15” diameter drum and weighs roughly 2800 pounds. Below and in front of the stage, located on the upper and lower levels of frame, there are two 7” diameter x 40” rollers. The frame suspends a wire rope drum tube between two motor housing tubes, sending power through two gearings that meet in the center of the drum tube. The gearing provides a 3600:1 torque reduction for both motors, making the hoist extremely powerful. 1400 RPM motors engage inline gearing that provide 100% throughput to the drum. The 150:1 gear ratio turns the drum at 9 1/3 RPM … resulting in a base wrap that climbs 36 ½ feet per minute. The hoist handles six English sizes (ranging from 7/16” to ¾”) and 4 metric sizes (12mm – 18mm) of wire rope. The highest reach of the hoist is 1300 meters (4265 feet) wrapping 7/16” wire rope.


    There is no AC on this hoist. A total of 4 cubic feet of lithium polymer batteries provide a large reservoir of power for a system that is constantly receiving and using a small flow of voltage. Two battery packs are recharged by a 12” x 16” solar panel located on the roof of the hoist. A laser is fastened on the end of the davit boom and aimed directly down at the solar panel. Since the batteries are onboard, there is no way to lose power, but if the laser fails, there should be sufficient charge in the batteries to climb to the roof. The laser runs on the building’s power feed to the roof, the laser converts that power source to light, which the solar panel then converts back to electricity; hence, the hoist batteries are recharged in use, and the DC power controls maintain the battery charge level at 95%. The idea is to take advantage of lithium polymer batteries being very good at discharge and recharge. In essence, the laser does the job of an electric cord… it feeds power to the stage, only it does it wireless.


    There are no load-free lines such as an electric cord or nylon/polyurethane rope, the wire rope load line is the sole line on each end of the stage. Guard rail is structural; the operator can tie off to the back rail, while the pick is secured to the front guard rail. The hoist is balancing a front side and a back side, by positioning a heavy ballast in the bottom middle. The front two-foot work area is completely unobstructed, while the back side of the hoist has the fairlead, spreader, drum guide, batteries, power controls, and solar panel. The load line enters the fairlead 7” behind the stage. The load line is captured by tension rollers in the upper fairlead, which then feed a swivel sheave in the lower fairlead, the fairlead swivel sheave turns freely as does the spreader trolley it feeds, both are controlled by the drum guide trolley they feed, and the drum guide trolley is geared to the drum. The spreader is a precision spreader, there is absolutely zero pull to any point on the drum by the wire rope being under load. There are no electrical controls to the wire rope guide… it is solely an interaction of mechanical gears… impossible to fail. When the drum reverses direction, so does the guide; if the drum wrap hits the rim and heads back the other direction, so does the guide… the drum turns everything, the gears only turn if the drum turns. With over 6 vertical feet from the tension rollers in the upper fairlead to the capture of the wire rope on the drum, this hoist takes platform stability to a whole new level, the hoist is also balanced from left to right and front to back.


    Down direction is power off, pushing the pendant down button only releases the brakes… the hoist then free falls, gravity runs the down direction. The DC motor/generator recharges the battery in down direction, while the gearing and the generator constantly limit the drum rotation to 9 1/3 RPM. The drum will stop turning the moment the hoist sets down, and the wire rope remains taut with the tension rollers in the upper fairlead at all times. The drum is braked on each end by 2 giant friction brakes which take the entire load directly, each brake has 200 square inches braking area. It requires 12 1/6 pounds per square inch to stop the max. load (4865 pounds) of the ½” wire rope hoist. The brake is spring loaded, making the brake always on, the springs are accompanied by solenoids that hold off the brake when moving.


    I designed a davit roof truck that can suspend this hoist over the side and clear any size wall. The davit is really an electric crane. The 5 feet x 7 ½ feet davit truck supports a mast of 3 stages that fit inside each other, and a boom that swivels on top. The truck, mast, and boom weigh about 7 tons, and then there is boom counter weight of an additional 3 tons, so all total, 10 tons. The davit truck is also counterweight for the boom; when a drop site is chosen, the davit is jacked in the four corners, the hoist and boom counterweight are lifted (simultaneously), then the boom swivels on the mast and the stage is swung over the wall, then the boom ties back to the roof truck, there’s no need to tie down the truck to the building. The proper boom counter weight will be provided for stage weight and payload; the boom stays in balance, even at 500 pounds over the optimum working payload. A traction hoist and 2 pulleys, rigged to the boom counter weight, lift the mast into place, and then lift the boom counter weight, suspended from two pulleys on the back of the boom. Two men should be able to set up the mast, collapse the mast, and handle moves between drops. A pavement needs to be provided for the davit truck.


    It is temporary staging, custom built to work for each building. It is nearly zero maintenance, rugged equipment that will last as long as the building it is built for. It is high performance equipment, the stage is extremely stable, fast, and the wire rope guide wraps so accurate, the wire rope should last many years between changes. It is a powerful hoist, with a heavy duty super structure, that can handle heavy use as well as heavy projects. And it is wireless technology, onboard power, that puts full control of movement in the hands of the men on the stage. This is a very safe hoist that will never get stuck in the air for any reason.
     
  12. Days

    Days Governor

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    okay the hoist is now capable of seven wire rope sizes, while the davit truck has gone to two models....


    The Hoist and Davit

    This is the first scaffold hoist specifically designed for super tall buildings. Conventional scaffold hoists are not suited to the performance demands of the 1200 foot + environment, if our industry is going to gain access to the exterior of super tall buildings, we must enter a whole new paradigm of hoist performance. This hoist is a battery driven gearmotor hoist that employs two 60 Volt DC motor/ generators working in tandem behind air cooled planetary gearing. It is a much larger scaffold hoist than the world has ever seen, the hoist is 8 ½ feet tall, 5 feet wide, and 4 feet deep, constructed entirely from titanium. The hoist employs a 15” diameter drum and weighs roughly 2800 pounds. Below and in front of the stage, located on the upper and lower levels of frame, there are two 7” diameter x 40” rollers. The frame suspends a wire rope drum tube between two motor housing tubes, sending power through two gearings that meet in the center of the drum tube. The gearing provides a 3600:1 torque reduction for both motors, making the hoist extremely powerful. 1400 RPM motors engage inline gearing that provide 100% throughput to the drum. The 150:1 gear ratio turns the drum at 9 1/3 RPM … resulting in a base wrap that climbs 36 ½ feet per minute. The hoist handles four English sizes (7/16” ¾” 9/16” 5/8”) and 3 metric sizes (12mm 14mm 16mm) of wire rope. The highest reach of the hoist is 1300 meters (4265 feet) when wrapping 7/16” wire rope.


    There is no AC on this hoist. A total of 4 cubic feet of lithium polymer batteries provide a large reservoir of power for a system that is constantly receiving and using a small flow of voltage. Two battery packs are recharged by a 12” x 16” solar panel located on the roof of the hoist. A laser is fastened on the end of the davit boom and aimed directly down at the solar panel. Since the batteries are onboard, there is no way to lose power, but if the laser fails, there should be sufficient charge in the batteries to climb to the roof. The laser runs on the building’s power feed to the roof, the laser converts that power source to light, which the solar panel then converts back to electricity; hence, the hoist batteries are recharged in use, and the DC power controls maintain the battery charge level at 95%. The idea is to take advantage of lithium polymer batteries being very good at discharge and recharge. In essence, the laser does the job of an electric cord… it feeds power to the stage, only it does it wireless.


    There are no load-free lines such as an electric cord or nylon/polyurethane rope, the wire rope load line is the sole line on each end of the stage. Guard rail is structural; the operator can tie off to the back rail, while the pick is secured to the front guard rail. The hoist is balancing a front side and a back side, by positioning a heavy ballast in the bottom middle. The front two-foot work area is completely unobstructed, while the back side of the hoist has the fairlead, spreader, drum guide, batteries, power controls, and solar panel. The load line enters the fairlead 7” behind the stage. The load line is captured by tension rollers in the upper fairlead, which then feed a swivel sheave in the lower fairlead, the fairlead swivel sheave turns freely as does the spreader trolley it feeds, both are controlled by the drum guide trolley they feed, and the drum guide trolley is geared to the drum. The spreader is a precision spreader, there is absolutely zero pull to any point on the drum by the wire rope being under load. There are no electrical controls to the wire rope guide… it is solely an interaction of mechanical gears… impossible to fail. When the drum reverses direction, so does the guide; if the drum wrap hits the rim and heads back the other direction, so does the guide… the drum turns everything, the gears only turn if the drum turns. With over 6 vertical feet from the tension rollers in the upper fairlead to the capture of the wire rope on the drum, this hoist takes platform stability to a whole new level, the hoist is also balanced from left to right and front to back.


    Down direction is power off, pushing the pendant down button only releases the brakes… the hoist then free falls, gravity runs the down direction. The DC motor/generator recharges the battery in down direction, while the gearing and the generator constantly limit the drum rotation to 9 1/3 RPM. The drum will stop turning the moment the hoist sets down, and the wire rope remains taut with the tension rollers in the upper fairlead at all times. The drum is braked on each end by 2 giant friction brakes which take the entire load directly, each brake has 200 square inches braking area. It requires 12 1/6 pounds per square inch to stop the max. load (4865 pounds) of the ½” wire rope hoist. The brake is spring loaded, making the brake always on, the springs are accompanied by solenoids that hold off the brake when moving.


    I designed a davit roof truck that can suspend this hoist over the side and clear any size wall. The davit is really an electric crane. The davit truck supports a mast of 3 stages that fit inside each other, and a boom that swivels on top. There are two models, one is 5 feet x 8 feet, and the other is 5 feet x 10 feet, with their boom counter weight, both weigh about 12 tons. A traction hoist and 2 pulleys, rigged to the boom counter weight, lift the mast into place, and then lift the boom counter weight, suspended from two pulleys on the back of the boom. The davit truck is also counterweight for the boom; when a drop site is chosen, the davit is jacked in the four corners, the hoist and boom counterweight are lifted (simultaneously), then the boom swivels on the mast and the stage is swung over the wall. The proper boom counter weight will be provided for stage weight and payload; the boom stays in balance, even at 500 pounds over the optimum roof payload. Then the boom ties back to the roof truck, there’s no need to tie down the truck to the building. Two men should be able to set up the mast, collapse the mast, and handle moves between drops. A pavement needs to be provided for the davit truck.


    It is temporary staging, custom built to work for each building. It is nearly zero maintenance, rugged equipment that will last as long as the building it is built for. It is high performance equipment, the stage is extremely stable, fast, and the wire rope guide wraps so accurate, the wire rope should last many years between changes. It is a powerful hoist, with a heavy duty super structure, that can handle heavy use as well as heavy projects. And it is wireless technology, onboard power, that puts full control of movement in the hands of the men on the stage. This is a very safe hoist that will never get stuck in the air for any reason.
     
  13. Days

    Days Governor

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    okay the hoist is still capable of seven wire rope sizes, but there is just one davit truck ....



    The Hoist and Davit


    This is the first scaffold hoist specifically designed for super tall buildings. Conventional scaffold hoists are not suited to the performance demands of the 1200 foot + environment, if our industry is going to gain access to the exterior of super tall buildings, we must enter a whole new paradigm of hoist performance. This hoist is a battery driven gearmotor hoist that employs two 60 Volt DC motor/ generators working in tandem behind air cooled planetary gearing. It is a much larger scaffold hoist than the world has ever seen, the hoist is 8 ½ feet tall, 5 feet wide, and 4 feet deep, constructed entirely from titanium. The hoist employs a 15” diameter drum and weighs roughly 2800 pounds. Below and in front of the stage, located on the upper and lower levels of frame, there are two 7” diameter x 40” rollers. The frame suspends a wire rope drum tube between two motor housing tubes, sending power through two gearings that meet in the center of the drum tube. The gearing provides a 3600:1 torque reduction for both motors, making the hoist extremely powerful. 1400 RPM motors engage inline gearing that provide 100% throughput to the drum. The 150:1 gear ratio turns the drum at 9 1/3 RPM … resulting in a base wrap that climbs 36 ½ feet per minute. The hoist handles four English sizes (7/16” ¾” 9/16” 5/8”) and 3 metric sizes (12mm 14mm 16mm) of wire rope. The highest reach of the hoist is 1300 meters (4265 feet) when wrapping 7/16” wire rope.


    There is no AC on this hoist. A total of 4 cubic feet of lithium polymer batteries provide a large reservoir of power for a system that is constantly receiving and using a small flow of voltage. Two battery packs are recharged by a 12” x 16” solar panel located on the roof of the hoist. A laser is fastened on the end of the davit boom and aimed directly down at the solar panel. Since the batteries are onboard, there is no way to lose power, but if the laser fails, there should be sufficient charge in the batteries to climb to the roof. The laser runs on the building’s power feed to the roof, the laser converts that power source to light, which the solar panel then converts back to electricity; hence, the hoist batteries are recharged in use, and the DC power controls maintain the battery charge level at 95%. The idea is to take advantage of lithium polymer batteries being very good at discharge and recharge. In essence, the laser does the job of an electric cord… it feeds power to the stage, only it does it wireless.


    There are no load-free lines such as an electric cord or nylon/polyurethane rope, the wire rope load line is the sole line on each end of the stage. Guard rail is structural; the operator can tie off to the back rail, while the pick is secured to the front guard rail. The hoist is balancing a front side and a back side, by positioning a heavy ballast in the bottom middle. The front two-foot work area is completely unobstructed, while the back side of the hoist has the fairlead, spreader, drum guide, batteries, power controls, and solar panel. The load line enters the fairlead 7” behind the stage. The load line is captured by tension rollers in the upper fairlead, which then feed a swivel sheave in the lower fairlead, the fairlead swivel sheave turns freely as does the spreader trolley it feeds, both are controlled by the drum guide trolley they feed, and the drum guide trolley is geared to the drum. The spreader is a precision spreader, there is absolutely zero pull to any point on the drum by the wire rope being under load. There are no electrical controls to the wire rope guide… it is solely an interaction of mechanical gears… impossible to fail. When the drum reverses direction, so does the guide; if the drum wrap hits the rim and heads back the other direction, so does the guide… the drum turns everything, the gears only turn if the drum turns. With over 6 vertical feet from the tension rollers in the upper fairlead to the capture of the wire rope on the drum, this hoist takes platform stability to a whole new level, the hoist is also balanced from left to right and front to back.


    Down direction is power off, pushing the pendant down button only releases the brakes… the hoist then free falls, gravity runs the down direction. The DC motor/generator recharges the battery in down direction, while the gearing and the generator constantly limit the drum rotation to 9 1/3 RPM. The drum will stop turning the moment the hoist sets down, and the wire rope remains taut with the tension rollers in the upper fairlead at all times. The drum is braked on each end by 2 giant friction brakes which take the entire load directly, each brake has 200 square inches braking area. It requires 12 1/6 pounds per square inch to stop the max. load (4865 pounds) of the ½” wire rope hoist. The brake is spring loaded, making the brake always on, the springs are accompanied by solenoids that hold off the brake when moving.


    I designed a davit roof truck that can suspend this hoist over the side and clear any size wall. The davit is really an electric crane. The davit truck supports a mast of 3 stages that fit inside each other, and a boom that swivels on top. The rear wheel drive davit truck is 5 feet x 10 feet, with the 2 ¼ ton boom counter weight, the davit truck weighs about 12 tons. A traction hoist and 2 pulleys, rigged to the boom counter weight, lift the mast into place, and then lift the boom counter weight, suspended from two pulleys on the back of the boom. The davit truck is also counterweight for the boom; when a drop site is chosen, the davit is jacked in the four corners, the hoist and boom counterweight are lifted (simultaneously), then the boom swivels on the mast and the stage is swung over the wall. The proper boom counter weight will be provided for stage weight and payload; the boom stays in balance, even at 500 pounds over the optimum roof payload. Then the boom ties back to the roof truck, there’s no need to tie down the truck to the building. Two men should be able to set up the mast, collapse the mast, and handle moves between drops. A pavement needs to be provided for the davit truck.


    It is temporary staging, custom built to work for each building. It is nearly zero maintenance, rugged equipment that will last as long as the building it is built for. It is high performance equipment, the stage is extremely stable, fast, and the wire rope guide wraps so accurate, the wire rope should last many years between changes. It is a powerful hoist, with a heavy duty super structure, that can handle heavy use as well as heavy projects. And it is wireless technology, onboard power, that puts full control of movement in the hands of the men on the stage. This is a very safe hoist that will never get stuck in the air for any reason.


     
  14. Winston

    Winston Do you feel lucky, Punk

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    Are these meant to be operated by the 25 foot tall people
     
  15. Days

    Days Governor

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    So, the design phase is officially over. The final letter on design is in the mail... now I wait to see if Harold wants to try to make this corporation happen. The whole design was just an idea for Harold to work with, it lives or dies at his whim. If he gives it a go, and if the world wants to buy it, then my brothers and I would build it (if my brothers want to do that, I'm waiting for Harold's decision and then we get to see if the bros are onboard with it). It took me 11 months to communicate the whole design, during that time, I redesigned the entire bloody hoist and davit/crane. This is the final letter, that I just mailed...


    March 25, 2019


    Dear Harold, Mike, and Al,

    Going to pick up details and design notes. Starting with the way to ship and pull out/extend the middle-mast. The middle-mast bolts to the top mast via a 2” thick x 10” bolt located 4” from the top, on the same axis as the corner plug. The top-mast has a 2” hole located 3” from its top, that the boom collar bolts through. So, for shipping, the middle-mast could bolt through that top-mast hole, except, there is only a 2” ID to the top-mast, so if a 2” thick bolt is used, there is nothing to snap hook to, so for shipping, we use a ½” thick bolt, washers, and a nut. The bolt head, washers, and nut fit into the corners of the bottom mast. The middle-mast will never be that far inside the bottom-mast that a man couldn’t easily reach in with a snap hook and catch the shipping bolt. (remember, the sample rig of an 11-foot wall? The middle-mast ships 9” inside the bottom-mast.) Once the middle mast is extended, the shipping bolt is removed.


    I never did the cut-away view of the brake. I figure you guys got it. But there’s some cool things that happened with the new brake design and I never covered them. For one, I replaced the entire part outlay of transferring the braking load from the round brake pad/drum stop to the square mainframe with a single part that had the round and the square … and it did it via a 45-degree angle that turned that corner. That new octagonal brake design was genius, it even gave me an extra ¾” breathing room for my drop-down worm gear mooring. I’ll do the sides at 10” x 4”, so the corner spaces are 7” x 7” right triangles. There’s more…


    The 3 vertical square tubes that separate the motor housing tube and brake from the battery compartment are now 3/8” thick x 19” tall. The octagonal brake slides on the center 10” of each side, so it is only 17” tall, hence, the opportunity arrives to make all 3 vertical square tubes the same height and take the same 1” thick mainframe bolt. That does some wonderful things for ventilation, first, it opens the outside compartment around the motor housing tube formed by the outside ½” thick frame plate and the two ¼” thick middle frame plates. It also opens a second ventilation shaft in the other inside corner of the battery compartment. The ¾” thick bolt plate covers that corner of the brake, so dust shouldn’t go directly into the ventilation flow of air, it is important to keep it clean of dust. This ventilation flow for the battery compartment is important because it provides flow through for the motor housing tube holes that feed the air cooling of the drum tube gears. It also keeps the batteries cooler. I think it may have saved the whole design. My whole game plan was to do the planetary gearing with a lower RPM motor feed (1400 RPM instead of 1725 RPM) and to use the big fans and unfiltered feed of air to keep the gears cool without a transmission oil bath. I don’t believe it has ever been done, this should be the first air-cooled planetary gears. My design kills all the speed in the first transfer to the gerbil gears; and the big fans are either blowing directly on that first transfer gearing or sucking from it.


    The only alternative to air cooled planetary gears is to fill the entire drum tube with gear oil from end plate to end plate, something I didn’t want to do for multiple reasons; not the least of which was figuring out how to make a seal with the end plates; those are not bolted in, they are held in by the motor housing tubes, how the heck would I bolt those on? Then there’s the weight, and the weight ruins the spin balance of the gears, and also it is a maintenance nightmare. On top of all that, what could happen if the system fails? If gear oil seeps through the center shaft race and the fan blows it into the motor armature, killing the electrical down-brake, then the hoist runs away. So, the air-cooled planetary gears have to work or the whole design fails. This is the huge design leap that takes us from a drum hoist to a gear motor hoist.


    On the davit truck, the mast-channel 3” thick plates bolt in from underneath the deck with 1” thick bolts, while the transmission box 2” thick plates bolt down through the deck with ¾” thick bolts. I use the same gearmotors, one side has the gear motor on the last tranny gear and it runs to the rear of the truck, while the other side has the gear motor on the 3rd tranny gear and it runs to the front of the truck. The gearmotors have to clear the mast-channel bolt heads, which they will, because they need plates against the underside of the deck to lower their shafts to the tranny gears, but we have to plan the location of the bolts to provide gaps for those mounting plates.


    The design needs to educate the market, teach them what they need for the long-term maintenance of skyscrapers. To me, that’s the hardest nut to turn… I couldn’t do it, but if anyone could do it, Harold could. That doesn’t mean they will get on-board… those people hate spending money. But no one else is going to come up with this design. This is really their one opportunity to add this hoist and crane to their tool box. Harold should only attempt to give the planet this hoist if it is something he really, really wants to do. There’s also the education of the operators, especially the adaptation from rigging with a roof davit to rigging with a rolling crane. Sound like fun?

    Lotsa love, Damian

     
  16. Days

    Days Governor

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    Okay, today, after one year of design, I wrote my final letter on design. And, thanks to the enlargement of the drum cavity, my final design tweak was to return to the 1200 RPM motor/generator. So, this is the description that, hopefully, will find its way into the hands of an investor wanting to build this design. This is an example of a design so good, it literally creates its own market. Now, I get to sit back and watch the wheels turn. If an investor likes it and if enough market interest is generated, this design could take scaffold hoists from the stone age to the technology age.



    The Hoist and Davit


    This is the first scaffold hoist specifically designed for super tall buildings. Conventional scaffold hoists are not suited to the performance demands of the 1200 foot + environment, if our industry is going to gain access to the exterior of super tall buildings, we must enter a whole new paradigm of hoist performance. This hoist is a battery driven gearmotor hoist that employs two 60 Volt DC motor/ generators working in tandem behind air cooled planetary gearing. It is a much larger scaffold hoist than the world has ever seen, the hoist is 8 ½ feet tall, 5 feet wide, and 4 feet deep, constructed entirely from titanium. The hoist employs a 15” diameter drum and weighs roughly 2800 pounds. Below and in front of the stage, located on the upper and lower levels of frame, there are two 7” diameter x 40” rollers. The frame suspends a wire rope drum tube between two motor housing tubes, sending power through two gearings that meet in the center of the drum tube. The gearing provides a 3600:1 torque reduction for both motors, making the hoist extremely powerful. 1200 RPM motors engage inline gearing that provide 100% throughput to the drum. The 150:1 gear ratio turns the drum at 8 RPM … resulting in a base wrap that climbs 31 ½ feet per minute. The hoist handles four English sizes (7/16” ¾” 9/16” 5/8”) and 3 metric sizes (12mm 14mm 16mm) of wire rope. The highest reach of the hoist is 1300 meters (4265 feet) when wrapping 7/16” wire rope.


    There is no AC on this hoist. A total of 4 cubic feet of lithium polymer batteries provide a large reservoir of power for a system that is constantly receiving and using a small flow of voltage. Two battery packs are recharged by a 12” x 16” solar panel located on the roof of the hoist. A laser is fastened on the end of the davit boom and aimed directly down at the solar panel. Since the batteries are onboard, there is no way to lose power, but if the laser fails, there should be sufficient charge in the batteries to climb to the roof. The laser runs on the building’s power feed to the roof, the laser converts that power source to light, which the solar panel then converts back to electricity; hence, the hoist batteries are recharged in use, and the DC power controls maintain the battery charge level at 95%. The idea is to take advantage of lithium polymer batteries being very good at discharge and recharge. In essence, the laser does the job of an electric cord… it feeds power to the stage, only it does it wireless.


    There are no load-free lines such as an electric cord or nylon/polyurethane rope, the wire rope load line is the sole line on each end of the stage. Guard rail is structural; the operator can tie off to the back rail, while the pick is secured to the front guard rail. The hoist is balancing a front side and a back side, by positioning a heavy ballast in the bottom middle. The front two-foot work area is completely unobstructed, while the back side of the hoist has the fairlead, spreader, drum guide, batteries, power controls, and solar panel. The load line enters the fairlead 7” behind the stage. The load line is captured by tension rollers in the upper fairlead, which then feed a swivel sheave in the lower fairlead, the fairlead swivel sheave turns freely as does the spreader trolley it feeds, both are controlled by the drum guide trolley they feed, and the drum guide trolley is geared to the drum. The spreader is a precision spreader, there is absolutely zero pull to any point on the drum by the wire rope being under load. There are no electrical controls to the wire rope guide… it is solely an interaction of mechanical gears… impossible to fail. When the drum reverses direction, so does the guide; if the drum wrap hits the rim and heads back the other direction, so does the guide… the drum turns everything, the gears only turn if the drum turns. With over 6 vertical feet from the tension rollers in the upper fairlead to the capture of the wire rope on the drum, this hoist takes platform stability to a whole new level, the hoist is also balanced from left to right and front to back.


    Down direction is power off, pushing the pendant down button only releases the brakes… the hoist then free falls, gravity runs the down direction. The DC motor/generator recharges the battery in down direction, while the gearing and the generator constantly limit the drum rotation to 9 1/3 RPM. The drum will stop turning the moment the hoist sets down, and the wire rope remains taut with the tension rollers in the upper fairlead at all times. The drum is braked on each end by 2 giant friction brakes which take the entire load directly, each brake has 200 square inches braking area. It requires 12 1/6 pounds per square inch to stop the max. load (4865 pounds) of the ½” wire rope hoist. The brake is spring loaded, making the brake always on, the springs are accompanied by solenoids that hold off the brake when moving.


    I designed a davit roof truck that can suspend this hoist over the side and clear any size wall. The davit is really an electric crane. The davit truck supports a mast of 3 stages that fit inside each other, and a boom that swivels on top. The rear wheel drive davit truck is 5 feet x 10 feet, with the 2 ¼ ton boom counter weight, the davit truck weighs about 12 tons. A traction hoist and 2 pulleys, rigged to the boom counter weight, lift the mast into place, and then lift the boom counter weight, suspended from two pulleys on the back of the boom. The davit truck is also counterweight for the boom; when a drop site is chosen, the davit is jacked in the four corners, the hoist and boom counterweight are lifted (simultaneously), then the boom swivels on the mast and the stage is swung over the wall. The proper boom counter weight will be provided for stage weight and payload; the boom stays in balance, even at 500 pounds over the optimum roof payload. Then the boom ties back to the roof truck, there’s no need to tie down the truck to the building. Two men should be able to set up the mast, collapse the mast, and handle moves between drops. A pavement needs to be provided for the davit truck.


    It is temporary staging, custom built to work for each building. It is nearly zero maintenance, rugged equipment that will last as long as the building it is built for. It is high performance equipment, the stage is extremely stable, fast, and the wire rope guide wraps so accurate, the wire rope should last many years between changes. It is a powerful hoist, with a heavy duty super structure, that can handle heavy use as well as heavy projects. And it is wireless technology, onboard power, that puts full control of movement in the hands of the men on the stage. This is a very safe hoist that will never get stuck in the air for any reason.
     
  17. Days

    Days Governor

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    This is the final letter, that I just mailed... (last second changes to page 2, had to catch the 8 RPM drum speed again and the weight of the davit truck is versatile)



    The Hoist and Davit


    This is the first scaffold hoist specifically designed for super tall buildings. Conventional scaffold hoists are not suited to the performance demands of the 1200 foot + environment, if our industry is going to gain access to the exterior of super tall buildings, we must enter a whole new paradigm of hoist performance. This hoist is a battery driven gearmotor hoist that employs two 60 Volt DC motor/ generators working in tandem behind air cooled planetary gearing. It is a much larger scaffold hoist than the world has ever seen, the hoist is 8 ½ feet tall, 5 feet wide, and 4 feet deep, constructed entirely from titanium. The hoist employs a 15” diameter drum and weighs roughly 2800 pounds. Below and in front of the stage, located on the upper and lower levels of frame, there are two 7” diameter x 40” rollers. The frame suspends a wire rope drum tube between two motor housing tubes, sending power through two gearings that meet in the center of the drum tube. The gearing provides a 3600:1 torque reduction for both motors, making the hoist extremely powerful. 1200 RPM motors engage inline gearing that provide 100% throughput to the drum. The 150:1 gear ratio turns the drum at 8 RPM … resulting in a base wrap that climbs 31 ½ feet per minute. The hoist handles four English sizes (7/16” ¾” 9/16” 5/8”) and 3 metric sizes (12mm 14mm 16mm) of wire rope. The highest reach of the hoist is 1300 meters (4265 feet) when wrapping 7/16” wire rope.


    There is no AC on this hoist. A total of 4 cubic feet of lithium polymer batteries provide a large reservoir of power for a system that is constantly receiving and using a small flow of voltage. Two battery packs are recharged by a 12” x 16” solar panel located on the roof of the hoist. A laser is fastened on the end of the davit boom and aimed directly down at the solar panel. Since the batteries are onboard, there is no way to lose power, but if the laser fails, there should be sufficient charge in the batteries to climb to the roof. The laser runs on the building’s power feed to the roof, the laser converts that power source to light, which the solar panel then converts back to electricity; hence, the hoist batteries are recharged in use, and the DC power controls maintain the battery charge level at 95%. The idea is to take advantage of lithium polymer batteries being very good at discharge and recharge. In essence, the laser does the job of an electric cord… it feeds power to the stage, only it does it wireless.


    There are no load-free lines such as an electric cord or nylon/polyurethane rope, the wire rope load line is the sole line on each end of the stage. Guard rail is structural; the operator can tie off to the back rail, while the pick is secured to the front guard rail. The hoist is balancing a front side and a back side, by positioning a heavy ballast in the bottom middle. The front two-foot work area is completely unobstructed, while the back side of the hoist has the fairlead, spreader, drum guide, batteries, power controls, and solar panel. The load line enters the fairlead 7” behind the stage. The load line is captured by tension rollers in the upper fairlead, which then feed a swivel sheave in the lower fairlead, the fairlead swivel sheave turns freely as does the spreader trolley it feeds, both are controlled by the drum guide trolley they feed, and the drum guide trolley is geared to the drum. The spreader is a precision spreader, there is absolutely zero pull to any point on the drum by the wire rope being under load. There are no electrical controls to the wire rope guide… it is solely an interaction of mechanical gears… impossible to fail. When the drum reverses direction, so does the guide; if the drum wrap hits the rim and heads back the other direction, so does the guide… the drum turns everything, the gears only turn if the drum turns. With over 6 vertical feet from the tension rollers in the upper fairlead to the capture of the wire rope on the drum, this hoist takes platform stability to a whole new level, the hoist is also balanced from left to right and front to back.


    Down direction is power off, pushing the pendant down button only releases the brakes… the hoist then free falls, gravity runs the down direction. The DC motor/generator recharges the battery in down direction, while the gearing and the generator constantly limit the drum rotation to 8 RPM. The drum will stop turning the moment the hoist sets down, and the wire rope remains taut with the tension rollers in the upper fairlead at all times. The drum is braked on each end by 2 giant friction brakes which take the entire load directly, each brake has 200 square inches braking area. It requires 12 1/6 pounds per square inch to stop the max. load (4865 pounds) of the ½” wire rope hoist. The brake is spring loaded, making the brake always on, the springs are accompanied by solenoids that hold off the brake when moving.


    I designed a davit roof truck that can suspend this hoist over the side and clear any size wall. The davit is really an electric crane. The davit truck supports a mast of 3 stages that fit inside each other, and a boom that swivels on top. The rear wheel drive davit truck is 5 feet x 10 feet, with the 2 ¼ - 2 ½ ton boom counter weight, the davit truck weighs 9 - 12 tons. A traction hoist and 2 pulleys, rigged to the boom counter weight, lift the mast into place, and then lift the boom counter weight, suspended from two pulleys on the back of the boom. The davit truck is also counterweight for the boom; when a drop site is chosen, the davit is jacked in the four corners, the hoist and boom counterweight are lifted (simultaneously), then the boom swivels on the mast and the stage is swung over the wall. The proper boom counter weight will be provided for stage weight and payload; the boom stays in balance, even at 500 pounds over the optimum roof payload. Then the boom ties back to the roof truck, there’s no need to tie down the truck to the building. Two men should be able to set up the mast, collapse the mast, and handle moves between drops. A pavement needs to be provided for the davit truck.


    It is temporary staging, custom built to work for each building. It is nearly zero maintenance, rugged equipment that will last as long as the building it is built for. It is high performance equipment, the stage is extremely stable, fast, and the wire rope guide wraps so accurate, the wire rope should last many years between changes. It is a powerful hoist, with a heavy duty super structure, that can handle heavy use as well as heavy projects. And it is wireless technology, onboard power, that puts full control of movement in the hands of the men on the stage. This is a very safe hoist that will never get stuck in the air for any reason.
     
  18. Days

    Days Governor

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    made a couple more tweaks, and voila.....



    The Hoist and Davit


    This is the first scaffold hoist specifically designed for super tall buildings. Conventional scaffold hoists are not suited to the performance demands of the 1200 foot + environment, if our industry is going to gain access to the exterior of super tall buildings, we must enter a whole new paradigm of hoist performance. This hoist is a battery driven gearmotor hoist that employs two 60 Volt DC motor/ generators working in tandem behind air cooled planetary gearing. It is a much larger scaffold hoist than the world has ever seen, the hoist is 8 ½ feet tall, 5 feet wide, and 4 feet deep, constructed entirely from titanium. The hoist employs a 15 ¼” diameter drum and weighs roughly 3000 pounds. Below and in front of the stage, located on the upper and lower levels of frame, there are two 7” diameter x 40” rollers. The frame suspends a wire rope drum tube between two motor housing tubes, sending power through two gearings that meet in the center of the drum tube. The gearing provides a 3600:1 torque reduction for both motors, making the hoist extremely powerful. 1200 RPM motors engage inline gearing that provide 100% throughput to the drum. The 150:1 gear ratio turns the drum at 8 RPM … resulting in a base wrap that climbs 32 feet per minute. The hoist handles four English sizes (7/16” ¾” 9/16” 5/8”) and 3 metric sizes (12mm 14mm 16mm) of wire rope. The highest reach of the hoist is 1300 meters (4265 feet) when wrapping 7/16” wire rope.


    There is no AC on this hoist. A total of 4 cubic feet of lithium polymer batteries provide a large reservoir of power for a system that is constantly receiving and using a small flow of voltage. Two battery packs are recharged by a 12” x 16” solar panel located on the roof of the hoist. A laser is fastened on the end of the davit boom and aimed directly down at the solar panel. Since the batteries are onboard, there is no way to lose power, but if the laser fails, there should be sufficient charge in the batteries to climb to the roof. The laser runs on the building’s power feed to the roof, the laser converts that power source to light, which the solar panel then converts back to electricity; hence, the hoist batteries are recharged in use, and the DC power controls maintain the battery charge level at 95%. The idea is to take advantage of lithium polymer batteries being very good at discharge and recharge. In essence, the laser does the job of an electric cord… it feeds power to the stage, only it does it wireless.


    There are no load-free lines such as an electric cord or nylon/polyurethane rope, the wire rope load line is the sole line on each end of the stage. Guard rail is structural; the operator can tie off to the back rail, while the pick is secured to the front guard rail. The hoist is balancing a front side and a back side, by positioning a heavy ballast in the bottom middle. The front two-foot work area is completely unobstructed, while the back side of the hoist has the fairlead, spreader, drum guide, batteries, power controls, and solar panel. The load line enters the fairlead 7” behind the stage. The load line is captured by tension rollers in the upper fairlead, which then feed a swivel sheave in the lower fairlead, the fairlead swivel sheave turns freely as does the spreader trolley it feeds, both are controlled by the drum guide trolley they feed, and the drum guide trolley is geared to the drum. The spreader is a precision spreader, there is absolutely zero pull to any point on the drum by the wire rope being under load. There are no electrical controls to the wire rope guide… it is solely an interaction of mechanical gears… impossible to fail. When the drum reverses direction, so does the guide; if the drum wrap hits the rim and heads back the other direction, so does the guide… the drum turns everything, the gears only turn if the drum turns. With over 6 vertical feet from the tension rollers in the upper fairlead to the capture of the wire rope on the drum, this hoist takes platform stability to a whole new level, the hoist is also balanced from left to right and front to back.


    Down direction is power off, pushing the pendant down button only releases the brakes… the hoist then free falls, gravity runs the down direction. The DC motor/generator recharges the battery in down direction, while the gearing and the generator constantly limit the drum rotation to 8 RPM. The drum will stop turning the moment the hoist sets down, and the wire rope remains taut with the tension rollers in the upper fairlead at all times. The drum is braked on each end by 2 giant friction brakes which take the entire load directly, each brake has 200 square inches braking area. The projected maximum load (4 ½ tons) requires 22 ½ pounds per square inch to stop. The brake is spring loaded, making the brake always on, the springs are accompanied by solenoids that hold off the brake when moving.


    I designed a davit roof truck that can suspend this hoist over the side and clear any size wall. The davit is really an electric crane. The davit truck supports a mast of 3 stages that fit inside each other, and a boom that swivels on top. The rear wheel drive davit truck is 5 feet x 10 feet, with the 2 ¼ - 2 ½ ton boom counter weight, the davit truck weighs 9 - 12 tons. A traction hoist and 2 pulleys, rigged to the boom counter weight, lift the mast into place, and then lift the boom counter weight, suspended from two pulleys on the back of the boom. The davit truck is also counterweight for the boom; when a drop site is chosen, the davit is jacked in the four corners, the hoist and boom counterweight are lifted (simultaneously), then the boom swivels on the mast and the stage is swung over the wall. The proper boom counter weight will be provided for stage weight and payload; the boom stays in balance, even at 500 pounds over the optimum roof payload. Then the boom ties back to the roof truck, there’s no need to tie down the truck to the building. Two men should be able to set up the mast, collapse the mast, and handle moves between drops. A pavement needs to be provided for the davit truck.


    It is temporary staging, custom built to work for each building. It is nearly zero maintenance, rugged equipment that will last as long as the building it is built for. It is high performance equipment, the stage is extremely stable, fast, and the wire rope guide wraps so accurate, the wire rope should last many years between changes. It is a powerful hoist, with a heavy duty super structure, that can handle heavy use as well as heavy projects. And it is wireless technology, onboard power, that puts full control of movement in the hands of the men on the stage. This is a very safe hoist that will never get stuck in the air for any reason.
     
  19. Days

    Days Governor

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    okay, the wire rope speed and reach charts are in the mail. This hoist wraps 32 feet per minute on its base wrap. That's nominal average speed for a scaffold hoist. But the speed picks up as the drum fills with rope, the fastest final wrap is 12 mm wire rope and it hits 60 feet per minute on the 15th level of wire rope. So, it takes twice as much power to wrap that final wrap, but power should not be a problem for this hoist.

    get an idea how futuristic this hoist is, here's the reach of the hoist for the 6 wire rope sizes:
    • 7/16" ............ 1380 meters
    • 12 mm .......... 1250 meters
    • 1/2" .............. 1060 meters
    • 14 mm ........... 880 meters
    • 9/16" ............. 790 meters
    • 16 mm ........... 645 meters
    the tallest roof in the world right now is 645 meters. This hoist will reach a 3/4 mile roof on the 12 mm size wire rope. There are compression issues that limit how high skyscrapers can go. They can go higher if they build taller floors, but that makes floor space very expensive. Someone might build something super tall and try to recoup the expense through the novelty and fame of being so ridiculously high, but you don't generally take huge risks like that with the most expensive buildings being built. I expect roof heights to linger in the 2000 - 2500 foot range the rest of my life. Maybe one or two buildings does something crazy (I hope so) ... even then, I expect to be able to reach those heights with 1/2" WIRE ROPE.

    The reason I returned to this design five years ago was not because so many super tall skyscrapers were being built - there is barely a market for this hoist - the real reason I went back to the design was because three technologies had developed that made it possible to build the hoist:
    • Lithium polymer batteries
    • lasers
    • solar panels
    Originally the hoist was supposed to handle wire ropes sizes 3/8', 7/16", and 1/2"... but the hoist is too large for that range. The range that it will likely employ is 1/2", 9/16", and 5/8". Frankly, I expect to build almost exclusively in the 14 mm to 9/16" range. It would take someone wanting to handle super heavy payloads to go to 16 mm wire rope or someone wanting to go to super high heights to go to 1/2" wire rope.


    the charts should be arriving tomorrow, so this design is ready to go. I started mailings April 20, 2018, so it was 13 months in design phase. Now, the design was bouncing around in my head for over 30 years before that. Even I didn't fully appreciate what this monster was, but now I look at it for what it is; a super modified rolling electric crane. Instead of having the drum in the tower, it is on the other end of the wire rope, and instead of having a ball/hook at the end of the wire rope, it is attached to the boom... but it is the same components and the same operation, it is an actual crane, but it is a different kind of crane, to be sure.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2019
  20. Days

    Days Governor

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    So, I did these writings to show a design as it progressed, as it was happening. Engineers might have found this thread interesting. The design is finished, I haven't any idea what happens next, but simply coming up with the design was quite an experience for me. I didn't show the drawings on this thread (haven't obtained any patents yet) but I tried to show the overall concept and what it can do. I put this letter in the mail a couple of days ago, this tells you how the product would be employed...



    May 21, 2019


    Dear Harold, Mike, and Al,

    This is how the 15 ¼” OD, 8 RPM drum tube hoist addresses the market:


    Roof heights up to 1500 feet can be rigged with Python 9/16” wire rope at the 6:1 safety factor, and there is going to be just over 3 tons of working payload for the stage. If we rigged Willis Tower (Sears Tower) with Python 9/16” wire rope at the 6:1 safety factor, we could build the 9-ton davit truck, and still provide that 3-ton payload for the stage. 1500 feet of 9/16” wire rope fills to the 8th level on the drum tube, which wraps at 46 feet per minute. Sound like a perfect fit?


    That is the perfect product line for all tall skyscrapers with roofs under 1500 feet high. They get the 9-ton davit truck and a stage with 3 tons of working payload while staying within the 6:1 safety factor for the wire rope.


    Then, for roof heights from 1500 feet to 2900 feet, we can go to the 14 mm titanium wire rope, and still provide 2 tons of working payload for the stage, at the 6:1 safety factor. And still go to a 9-ton davit truck if it is needed.


    How about a 3000-foot high roof? Someone or some few architects are itching to go there. Before we automatically go to ½” wire rope, there is an in between size: 13 mm, that should be slightly stronger than ½”. At this height, working payloads get pretty skinny, we want all the breaking strength we can get, so it makes sense to go to a 13 mm titanium wire rope for roof heights up to 1025 meters. I’ve included a speed and reach chart for 13 mm wire rope, so I guess that will get used from 2900 feet to 3365 feet.


    Then for roof heights from 3365 feet to 3475 feet, we can still provide a stage with 750-800 pounds of working payload at a 6:1 safety factor if we find a strong ½” titanium wire rope. Any roof higher than 1060 meters will need to go to the 12 mm titanium wire rope and that’s going to be at a 5:1 safety factor. The 12 mm takes us all the way up to ¾ mile. So the real product line is: 9/16”, 14 mm, 13 mm, ½”, and 12 mm.

    Love, Day
     

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