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Today's case study on how to take a successful company

Discussion in 'Latest Political News and Current Events' started by connieb, Jun 13, 2017.

  1. connieb

    connieb Senator

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    and Fvck it up.... is brought to you by Uber.

    Uber, is the real world example of what happens when you start letting SJW pinheads into your organization...
    you end up with some whiners about "sexual harassment" and not liking their work environment.. THEN you screw up and invite in one of the biggest pinheads of all time Eric Holder. Who would like you to do things completely opposite of what actually promotes harmony and cohesive work environment as well as discourages the hiring and promotion of only the brightest and the best - like making sure you figure out one token minority or woman that you can promote every now and then... instead of you know.. finding the most competent and productive person.......

    The company rocketed to success becasue the Frat boy - - cohesive management structure WORKS. When people are clicking and working well together and like working together and are hostile to interlopers - things actually do get done.... THEN inevitably, you don't adequately screen for some whiner pants.. and down hill it goes... one after another you let in and before you know it... you get this kind of bullcrap.

    If you own Uber.. I would consider selling now. Once these liberal jackasses get their hands in you.. its all over....
    https://www.theguardian.com/technol...avis-kalanick-leave-absence-scandal?CMP=fb_gu
     
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  2. The Thinker

    The Thinker Over The Top Abuser

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    Oh great... they're supposed to increase their *diversity* efforts. In other words, quit hiring the best people and get politically correct. They're doomed.
     
  3. connieb

    connieb Senator

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    Yep. Entrepreneurs are a special breed and the environment needed actually take something small and make it boom - IS usually a very college like environment... It is usually a lot of friend, partying it up, loving what they do, and kicking ass.

    THEN you have to start running a company, and INEVITABLY, you hire people to do that for you, that are only steeped in the standard business practices. Which ultimately KILLS your culuture, your environment and your mojo.... all while acting like they are doing some favor and being productive.
     
  4. as seen on tv

    as seen on tv Senator

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    Reality check -

    Uber's "business model" consists of

    • hiring people to use their own cars as taxis, irrespective of the cleanliness or suitability of that vehicle for use by passengers
    • telling Uber drivers - after they were hired - that they are being reclassified as "independent contractors". That means they don't have pensions, health care, or collective bargaining rights."
    • dodging municipal laws intended to relieve rush hour congestion - laws that limit the number of legitimate "taxi medallions" which are in service in a given area.

    an analogy - some entrepreneur takes the same idea, and comes up with "Uber Ambulance" - for a fraction of the cost, someone with a mini-van or SUV will show up at your house, but without any medical equipment or training - to take you to the emergency room. Or - better yet - dozens of "Uber Ambulances" will converge on every auto accident, hoping to get a "fare"

    Also waiting in the wings

    • "Uber air travel" (private pilots who will fly you where you want to go, no questions asked)
    • "Uber bodyguards" - no specific training or license to carry a firearm; they will simply administer a beat down if the paparazzi gets too close.
     
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  5. connieb

    connieb Senator

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    I don't ride in Uber or Lyft for that matter. And I won't be doing so anytime soon. I was raised far better than to get into a vehicle with a stranger. I don't even like using cabs, but at least then they are safety protocols in place for me and them.

    Regardless how I feel about it though, it is very popular. And will be more so once there are self driving cars. Furthermore, the Taxi industry HAS had a stronghold - on much of the transportation options, and I always like someone to challenge the status quo. And I also think a 1099 contractor is an appropriate designation. They do not tell them where to be, when to work, when they have to work, and have only broad descriptions of the "tools" they are allowed to use. Those meet the primary IRS qualifications for being an independent contractor. Furthermore, I generally have no interest in wading in an regulating above the bare bare minumum the relationship between the employer and employee. No one is forced by Uber to work for Uber. So, if you choose it, then that is what you get.

    connie
     
  6. georgephillip

    georgephillip Governor

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    Speaking thereof: do you consider Uber drivers independent contractors or official employees? Can Uber forgo paying benefits like workers' compensation, unemployment, and Social Security? Is Uber entitled to half its drivers' tips? How about taking responsibility for drivers' business expenses like gas, car insurance, and maintenance?
     
  7. connieb

    connieb Senator

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    Independent contractors. They meet all the basic IRS qualifications. They make their own work hours, they make their own tools, they carry their own insurance, and most importantly they are free to offer their services to others - i.e. have other jobs, or drive other people around.

    That is the classic independent contractor relationship. It is one that is well defined in case law. If you can't tell your employee where to work, when to work, and provide him what he needs to work AND - he is free to perform the same service for others.. he isn't your employee.
     
  8. georgephillip

    georgephillip Governor

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    California law classifies workers as employees if their tasks are central to a business and are substantially controlled by their employer. In our current level of technology Uber would not exist without drivers, no?
     
  9. connieb

    connieb Senator

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    Right, substantial control. Substantial control is defined by the tests I laid out.

    No business would exist without people to perform services - that does not make every electrician who works for a general contractor an employee. Or every plumber who fixes a leak in your house your employee.

    The substantial control is defined by things like - do you set the working hours for the person. Do you control whether they can offer their servcies to others. Do you provide the tools for them? Do you provide their work environment? Do you tell them where and when to show up? If the answer is no -then you do not substantially control them.
     
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  10. as seen on tv

    as seen on tv Senator

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    how interesting.

    you avoid Uber and taxis, because you're afraid of strangers.

    but you see no problem with hundreds of thousands of unvetted aliens piling into the USA.

    how do you reconcile these two views?
     
  11. Craig

    Craig Senator Supporting Member

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    I drove a taxi. In San Francisco, as well as Baltimore and Seattle. I was an independent contractor. All cab drivers in those locales are independent contractors. Cab drivers underwent FBI checks. Cab drivers in SF were required to have lived in SF for at least a year and demonstrate a considerable knowledge of the streets and buildings of The City. Taxi companies provided the vehicle, which drivers "leased" on a daily basis. "Gates and gas" were, at the time (this is the 80's), about $80...meaning a driver made not a penny until that figure was reached.

    None of that applied to Uber at the beginning.
     
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  12. connieb

    connieb Senator

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    What are you talking about? I favor very strict immigration controls.
     
  13. georgephillip

    georgephillip Governor

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    I had a brief experience driving cabs in the '80s myself, first in San Bernardino and later in LA. Veteran drivers I worked with told me it became much harder to earn a living driving a cab after the Arab oil boycott in 1973. Apparently, prior to that event, cab companies paid for the gas drivers used. When I drove in San Bernardino there was a gas pump in the yard, but it was no longer used by drivers. FWIW, I believe Uber is merely that latest scam in the terminal stage of capitalism. (sharing society?):rolleyes:
     
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  14. Craig

    Craig Senator Supporting Member

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    I didn't begin until after the '73 embargo and managed to do OK...in a congested Baltimore suburb. We operated "illegally" much of the time, crossing the boundary line to pick up people in the city when we were licensed in the county.

    San Francisco was unique in that it was easy to make money driving taxi at that time. There was a limit, just 711 licenses at the time, and SFO was the exclusive domain of the SF licensed cabs. With at least 100 cabs at the airport at all times, that made working The City a constant stream of street hails and radio calls. The City was under the boom times of the Blum/Feinstein high-rise extravaganza...which was good for business, but was just another nail in the long running tale of the ruination of San Francisco's bohemian vibe.
     
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