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In case I die tomorrow

Wahbooz

Governor
I don't know how to find the message in my dreams.
I do dream things that I think are important. Nothing has ever been something that comes true or anything. But I dream of places not that I've been to in real life, but the same dream places always recur and I know them not. That's got to mean something.
You've not been to in real life? Which life, Jen. Perhaps it's a memory that is revisiting from another time. I'm not a psychic, but I sometimes like listening to my friends dreams, and if I know something about them, I can sometimes see something they missed. I wouldn't doubt if there's a meaning in those dreams, you just need to search them out.
 

Jen

Trump 2020
You've not been to in real life? Which life, Jen. Perhaps it's a memory that is revisiting from another time. I'm not a psychic, but I sometimes like listening to my friends dreams, and if I know something about them, I can sometimes see something they missed. I wouldn't doubt if there's a meaning in those dreams, you just need to search them out.
The places are similar to places I've known, but there are a couple that I can't put anywhere in my memory. And those places come back in lots of dreams. Maybe it is from another time. I don't discount that as a possibility. Nothing in those places is frightening. My dreams aren't scary in any way. It also seems, though, that communication between people is more by telepathy than anything. There's really no vocalization. I'll tell you a dream when I have a fresh one to tell and see if you get something from it that I've missed.
 

Wahbooz

Governor
The places are similar to places I've known, but there are a couple that I can't put anywhere in my memory. And those places come back in lots of dreams. Maybe it is from another time. I don't discount that as a possibility. Nothing in those places is frightening. My dreams aren't scary in any way. It also seems, though, that communication between people is more by telepathy than anything. There's really no vocalization. I'll tell you a dream when I have a fresh one to tell and see if you get something from it that I've missed.
Interesting. Maybe we can figure it out together.
 
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Max R.

On the road
Supporting Member
I don't know how to find the message in my dreams.
I do dream things that I think are important. Nothing has ever been something that comes true or anything. But I dream of places not that I've been to in real life, but the same dream places always recur and I know them not. That's got to mean something.
Sweetie, your dreams are you. YOU. The non-verbal you. The huge part of your brain which is visual and sensual, but non-verbal. Nothing magical or mystical.

Just relax. Take a few relaxing breaths and let the first feeling of what those dreams mean come to you. Maybe it's nothing. Maybe it's something. It's all you.

Trust your instincts. They're like a muscle; the more you exercise them the stronger they'll become. It's not magic. Your instincts will make mistakes, but the more you trust your instincts, the more you'll learn and the more accurate they'll become.
 

Jen

Trump 2020
Sweetie, your dreams are you. YOU. The non-verbal you. The huge part of your brain which is visual and sensual, but non-verbal. Nothing magical or mystical.

Just relax. Take a few relaxing breaths and let the first feeling of what those dreams mean come to you. Maybe it's nothing. Maybe it's something. It's all you.

Trust your instincts. They're like a muscle; the more you exercise them the stronger they'll become. It's not magic. Your instincts will make mistakes, but the more you trust your instincts, the more you'll learn and the more accurate they'll become.
I always trust my instincts.
So why not for dreams too.
Good points.
Thanks, Max.
 

Max R.

On the road
Supporting Member
I always trust my instincts.
So why not for dreams too.
Good points.
Thanks, Max.
Sorry I haven't read the entire thread, but great to hear you trust your instincts and dreams. It's all you.

When I was 17 I had a NDE. Prior to that, I was a staunch atheist. Since then I've been on a spiritual journey researching both the human mind (I have a degree in Behavioral Psych) and the human condition (another degree in International Relations). I know nothing for certain, obviously, when it comes to spiritual matters, but like 98% of humanity I feel there is something more than what is in front of our noses.

From my NDE, I'm certain of it, but cannot vouch for what it is, exactly.
 

Max R.

On the road
Supporting Member
....That's what I worry about. I worry about what kind of life they will have left. If I lost either of them, it would kill me. This physical life has to end sooner or later, but I always thought it would be alright as long as I got all the furniture built (that's a metaphor) but now I realize, it isn't the furniture that was most important, it's the fish tanks and the plants... its the life, and how will any two of us survive without the 3rd?....
Recently I introduced my 57 year old wife to a the 1999 song/advice "Sunscreen". Part of it mentioned that worrying was useless. Most problems just blindside us on a lazy afternoon and worrying about things is "as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum".

Read more: Baz Luhrmann - Everybody's Free (to Wear Sunscreen) Lyrics | MetroLyrics

 

Jen

Trump 2020
Sorry I haven't read the entire thread, but great to hear you trust your instincts and dreams. It's all you.

When I was 17 I had a NDE. Prior to that, I was a staunch atheist. Since then I've been on a spiritual journey researching both the human mind (I have a degree in Behavioral Psych) and the human condition (another degree in International Relations). I know nothing for certain, obviously, when it comes to spiritual matters, but like 98% of humanity I feel there is something more than what is in front of our noses.

From my NDE, I'm certain of it, but cannot vouch for what it is, exactly.
I have read several books by Michael Newton: Journey of Souls; Destiny of Souls and Memories of the Afterlife. Newton is a hypnotist who takes people (supposedly) back to what was there before their birth. I believe the books are honest, but whether they are all and total truth, I can't be certain. At the very least they opened my mind to what may be. With your NDE, maybe these books would speak to you in some way. I recommend them. I am certain that there is more than we perceive. I grew very frustrated looking for it, demanding information from angels, God, whoever had that information.......... then I realized that my amnesia is what allows me to learn what I need to learn here and experience things in exactly the way I need to experience it. Without the amnesia, I would be hobbled in some way. So now I've accepted (grudgingly) the amnesia.

The Bible speaks as if we were "known" by God before we were born as a human. LINK. To me that indicates that there is a lot more to us than what we realize and no doubt a lot more going on around us than we realize. I don't think, however, that the religions of our world (any of those religions) capture the heart of what belief in God entails.
 

Max R.

On the road
Supporting Member
I have read several books by Michael Newton: Journey of Souls; Destiny of Souls and Memories of the Afterlife. Newton is a hypnotist who takes people (supposedly) back to what was there before their birth. I believe the books are honest, but whether they are all and total truth, I can't be certain. At the very least they opened my mind to what may be. With your NDE, maybe these books would speak to you in some way. I recommend them. I am certain that there is more than we perceive. I grew very frustrated looking for it, demanding information from angels, God, whoever had that information.......... then I realized that my amnesia is what allows me to learn what I need to learn here and experience things in exactly the way I need to experience it. Without the amnesia, I would be hobbled in some way. So now I've accepted (grudgingly) the amnesia.

The Bible speaks as if we were "known" by God before we were born as a human. LINK. To me that indicates that there is a lot more to us than what we realize and no doubt a lot more going on around us than we realize. I don't think, however, that the religions of our world (any of those religions) capture the heart of what belief in God entails.
I know nothing of those books. What I do know is what I know. One thing is to never trust a person who says they know what God wants. Another is to not trust a person who tells you you can't figure things out for yourself; that you need their help....for a price.
 

Wahbooz

Governor
The places are similar to places I've known, but there are a couple that I can't put anywhere in my memory. And those places come back in lots of dreams. Maybe it is from another time. I don't discount that as a possibility. Nothing in those places is frightening. My dreams aren't scary in any way. It also seems, though, that communication between people is more by telepathy than anything. There's really no vocalization. I'll tell you a dream when I have a fresh one to tell and see if you get something from it that I've missed.
There may or may not be any vocalization if you are communicating with the spirit world. Watch and listen to this video, Jen. It may provide some answers.

 

Jen

Trump 2020
I know nothing of those books. What I do know is what I know. One thing is to never trust a person who says they know what God wants. Another is to not trust a person who tells you you can't figure things out for yourself; that you need their help....for a price.
Yep. I agree with you on both of those.
I am figuring stuff out on my own (with a little reading to help open my eyes)
But I think you are a person who reads so take a look at those books in Amazon - you can see a bit of them there - and see if they are something that would interest you. Maybe they are or maybe they aren't - only you will know that.
 

Zam-Zam

Governor
Remember that goofy prayer, "Now I lay me down to sleep..."? I was always one to be happy to go, any night running, would have been fine with me. Such is the mood of a loner. I tried to sleep with both my wives, but that only works in a king sized bed and I was always poor. Now I'm old and poor. With old age comes pain. And one of the biggest pains is rememberring the stupid things we did and ways we thought in our lives. Today, I live for my wife and son, they need me, at least, I think they do.

I find myself wondering how they would survive if something happened to me. I feel I've woefully let them down, except for faith, I know they will go on believing and trusting. Maybe that was the most important thing to leave them.

We have 3 fish aquariums. Living plants, living moss balls, snails, pretty fish, it's a lot of work but living things keep you company, keep your spirits up. The wife runs a nursery, I send her the water I extract when I clean the gravel, the plants thrive on it, we had a geranium bloom in February, pretty cool experience. Thing is, you get something from living creatures, that the dead furniture doesn't supply. If I die tomorrow, the furniture I built will easily last my son's entire life, but I'm not sure he knows how to care for the fish... the fish give you a big boost, I am afraid they will lose the life they offer, the interaction, they add a big dimension to the home.

That's what I worry about. I worry about what kind of life they will have left. If I lost either of them, it would kill me. This physical life has to end sooner or later, but I always thought it would be alright as long as I got all the furniture built (that's a metaphor) but now I realize, it isn't the furniture that was most important, it's the fish tanks and the plants... its the life, and how will any two of us survive without the 3rd?

If I had the chance to write a note to my younger self, that's what I would have written to myself... focus more on the life, on living things. Instead of fretting over the dead stuff. Maybe I can still learn that.




When the perishable puts on the imperishable, and the mortal puts on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying that is written: “Death is swallowed up in victory.” “O death, where is your victory? O death, where is your sting?” The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

1 Corinthians 15:54-57
 

Days

Commentator
When the perishable puts on the imperishable, and the mortal puts on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying that is written: “Death is swallowed up in victory.” “O death, where is your victory? O death, where is your sting?” The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

1 Corinthians 15:54-57
We've already passed from death to life. The stinger has lost its venom, the Law was nailed to the cross. Where there is no commandment, there is no transgression. We've already entered the grace of our Lord. Now the idea is to grow in grace and wax strong in the Spirit.

The good news is that Jesus resurrected from the grave, conquered death, and we can receive his victorious spirit by calling on his name. When we receive his spirit, we pass from death to life. When we obey his voice, we enter the kingdom of God. A king's domain is anywhere his word has power.

thanks, Zam, I needed that.
 

Zam-Zam

Governor
We've already passed from death to life. The stinger has lost its venom, the Law was nailed to the cross. Where there is no commandment, there is no transgression. We've already entered the grace of our Lord. Now the idea is to grow in grace and wax strong in the Spirit.

The good news is that Jesus resurrected from the grave, conquered death, and we can receive his victorious spirit by calling on his name. When we receive his spirit, we pass from death to life. When we obey his voice, we enter the kingdom of God. A king's domain is anywhere his word has power.

thanks, Zam, I needed that.

God Bless You and Yours.

 

JackDallas

Senator
Supporting Member
We've already passed from death to life. The stinger has lost its venom, the Law was nailed to the cross. Where there is no commandment, there is no transgression. We've already entered the grace of our Lord. Now the idea is to grow in grace and wax strong in the Spirit.

The good news is that Jesus resurrected from the grave, conquered death, and we can receive his victorious spirit by calling on his name. When we receive his spirit, we pass from death to life. When we obey his voice, we enter the kingdom of God. A king's domain is anywhere his word has power.

thanks, Zam, I needed that.
Even a stopped clock is right twice a day. This was your time, Days.
 

Addy

Rebuild With Biden!
This is a very good read... re death.

The Terror of Death: Causes and Cures

1 Corinthians 15:26King James Version (KJV) 26 The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death.

The Unknown
One of the factors which surely contributes to our fear of death is that the phenomenon is so alien to our personal experience. We have never died before; we have no empirical data as to what it’s like beyond the veil of death.
Popular stories and personal testimonies regarding those who supposedly have died on the operating table — floating up into the air, seeing a bright light at the end of a tunnel, etc. — are worthless. Though such narratives may be told with earnestness, they are delusional.
While there were exceptional cases in biblical days, when people were raised from the dead (John 11:44), these had a redemptive purpose, and such supernatural events are not being duplicated today. The general rule is, “it is appointed unto men once to die” (Hebrews 9:27). Moreover, no one raised from the dead in those biblical examples ever uttered a word of testimony as to the nature of the experience


The Inevitable
There are so many things in life over which we seem to exercise considerable control. If one’s house burns, he rebuilds; if his automobile breaks down, it is repaired. Even our physical problems frequently can be remedied via surgery or medication.
In the final analysis, however, we are painfully aware of the fact that death is a persistently stalking “enemy” (1 Corinthians 15:26), which we cannot resist indefinitely. Possibly it is this feeling of helplessness, at least in part, that strikes such terror in the soul.
But this very feeling of weakness can be used to drive us closer to the One who has consummate power. I have reflected often upon the fact that “death” is an event that actually points to God.
If, as the advocates of evolution propose, raw nature has the amazing ability to create “life,” and, through natural processes, to produce the myriads of biological forms, why is there death? Cannot “mother nature” sustain what she has created? The philosophy of evolution has no explanation for death.
The Bible does. It is a judgment for sin (Romans 5:12). Death is a divine appointment (Hebrews 9:27).
Perhaps, therefore, some of our anxiety can be allayed if we think of death, not so much as a stalking, skeletal “reaper,” but as an event, allowed by God, to accommodate the transition from the physical realm to the spirit realm. It is but a journey — an “exodus” (2 Peter 1:15 — Grk. text), a departure, for the Christian — to some place very far better (Philippians 1:23). It is an inevitable joy!

Our Love of Life
Death is difficult to deal with because “this life” is all we’ve known. And, in spite of its heartaches, we fear leaving it. When Satan challenged God with the possibility of loyal Job’s apostasy, he asserted: “All that man has will he give for his life” (Job 2:4). There is many a wealthy man who would part with his millions for a little longer lease upon his earthly home.
Though this earth has been cursed horribly with the effects of sin (cf. Romans 8:20ff) it still is a beautiful place in so many respects. It is chilling to think that at death we will no more view the starry heavens or be bathed in the beauty of an autumn moon. Lush valleys, stately mountains, sparkling streams and shady groves will no longer lift our spirits. We contemplate these adornments, and with trembling souls, ask: “What could be better than this?”
The answer is one we must accept by faith. In a context that particularly addresses hardships, an inspired writer proclaims: “For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed to usward” (Romans 8:18).
Do I fully comprehend this? I do not. I just accept it. Not frivolously. Not gullibly. But on the basis of evidence — powerful evidence — that I have examined over a long period of time. It represents a case for the integrity of the Scriptures, which contain promises of hope. My confidence in these documents permits me to advance toward the exit of death with excited anticipation, even though I may experience a degree of nervousness.

https://www.christiancourier.com/articles/908-terror-of-death-causes-and-cures-the
 

Addy

Rebuild With Biden!
Some Facts About Death

Death has had a bad reputation throughout human history. It was pronounced as a penalty for Adam’s sin in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:17), and all human beings (with the exception of Enoch and Elijah) have picked up the “tab” as well (Romans 5:12).
Eventually everyone will die, with the exception of those who are alive at the time of Christ’s return (Hebrews 9:27; 1 Corinthians 15:51; 1 Thessalonians 4:15).
Bildad, Job’s friend, depicted death as the “king of terrors” (Job 18:14). A psalmist wrote of the “terrors of death,” and in connection therewith spoke of pain, fearfulness, trembling, and horror (Psalm 55:4). Even a New Testament writer tells of the “fear of death” that held all people in bondage prior to the redemptive work of Christ (Hebrews 2:14-15).

Exactly what is death? From the physical vantage point, death is the cessation of the biological functions of the body, with a subsequent disintegration of the flesh back to the dust of the earth whence it came originally (Genesis 2:7; 3:19; Ecclesiastes 12:7; 2 Corinthians 5:1)
.
Death is the release of one’s spirit from his body. At the point of death, the spirit (or soul), leaves the body (Genesis 35:18; James 2:26), and enters the appointed depository of spirits, the state of which depends upon the relationship of the deceased with God and his Son (cf. Luke 16:19ff). But the spirit does not fade into a lifeless nothingness.
Death is a sphere of consciousness. While death is sometimes described as a “sleep” (Daniel 12:2; John 11:11; 1 Corinthians 15:6ff; 1 Thessalonians 4:13ff), that expression applies solely to the temporary state of the body — not the soul.

The state of the spirit for those who die lost is one of “torment” and “anguish” (Luke 16:24-26), while the condition of the righteous is one of “comfort” (Luke 16:25). This is a state of “gain” that is “very far better” (Philippians 1:21-23) than the fairest scenes of earth’s environment. To be absent from the body is to be “at home with the Lord” (2 Corinthians 5:8), in a state of celestial “blessedness” (happiness – Revelation 14:13).
The dogma of “soul sleeping” is foreign to the Scriptures, though occasionally advocated by misguided professors of Christianity.

Death is a temporary phenomenon of the body. Even in its morbid disposition in the dust, it awaits the day of resurrection.

The concept of the bodily resurrection is found in both Testaments — though it is more prominent in the latter, since “life and immortality” have been brought into fuller view through the gospel of Christ (2 Timothy 1:10).

Daniel spoke of the resurrection of both the wicked and the faithful (Daniel 12:2), as did the Lord Jesus (John 5:28-29). Clearly, there is a destiny for both body and soul — hell for the wicked and heaven for the obedient (Matthew 10:28; 25:46; Mark 9:43-48).
There is a curious oddity in Hannover, Germany. A defiant atheist had his tomb covered with huge blocks of stone, bound with iron bands. There is this inscription: “This tomb is purchased for eternity; it will never be opened.”
Strangely, a poplar seed somehow was enclosed in the dark mold. Eventually, a mighty tree sprang up; it burst the bands asunder and moved the stones, as if waving leafy arms in defiance of the godless boast carved upon the marker. I have a photograph of this tomb with the protruding tree.
If a tiny seed can exert such force, think of the phenomenal demonstration, as the Creator of that seed demonstrates his power and all graves are opened.
We approach death with mixed emotions. We are grieved at the thought of leaving work undone and precious family behind.

On the other hand, for the child of God there is the tingling anticipation of being escorted by angels (Luke 16:22) into the blessed presence of Him who died for us, that we might be forever with the holy Godhead, the angels, the faithful of the ages, and our own loved ones who have died in Christ!


https://www.christiancourier.com/articles/1349-some-facts-about-death
 

Days

Commentator
Even a stopped clock is right twice a day. This was your time, Days.
I'm an Evangelical preacher who has brought thousands to Christ, yes thousands, Jack, my clock never stopped. I'll see you in the kingdom, just look for a very bright light. We need to chat about your idea that politics come before your faith.
 

Jen

Trump 2020
Some Facts About Death

Death has had a bad reputation throughout human history. It was pronounced as a penalty for Adam’s sin in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:17), and all human beings (with the exception of Enoch and Elijah) have picked up the “tab” as well (Romans 5:12).
Eventually everyone will die, with the exception of those who are alive at the time of Christ’s return (Hebrews 9:27; 1 Corinthians 15:51; 1 Thessalonians 4:15).
Bildad, Job’s friend, depicted death as the “king of terrors” (Job 18:14). A psalmist wrote of the “terrors of death,” and in connection therewith spoke of pain, fearfulness, trembling, and horror (Psalm 55:4). Even a New Testament writer tells of the “fear of death” that held all people in bondage prior to the redemptive work of Christ (Hebrews 2:14-15).

Exactly what is death? From the physical vantage point, death is the cessation of the biological functions of the body, with a subsequent disintegration of the flesh back to the dust of the earth whence it came originally (Genesis 2:7; 3:19; Ecclesiastes 12:7; 2 Corinthians 5:1)
.
Death is the release of one’s spirit from his body. At the point of death, the spirit (or soul), leaves the body (Genesis 35:18; James 2:26), and enters the appointed depository of spirits, the state of which depends upon the relationship of the deceased with God and his Son (cf. Luke 16:19ff). But the spirit does not fade into a lifeless nothingness.
Death is a sphere of consciousness. While death is sometimes described as a “sleep” (Daniel 12:2; John 11:11; 1 Corinthians 15:6ff; 1 Thessalonians 4:13ff), that expression applies solely to the temporary state of the body — not the soul.

The state of the spirit for those who die lost is one of “torment” and “anguish” (Luke 16:24-26), while the condition of the righteous is one of “comfort” (Luke 16:25). This is a state of “gain” that is “very far better” (Philippians 1:21-23) than the fairest scenes of earth’s environment. To be absent from the body is to be “at home with the Lord” (2 Corinthians 5:8), in a state of celestial “blessedness” (happiness – Revelation 14:13).
The dogma of “soul sleeping” is foreign to the Scriptures, though occasionally advocated by misguided professors of Christianity.

Death is a temporary phenomenon of the body. Even in its morbid disposition in the dust, it awaits the day of resurrection.

The concept of the bodily resurrection is found in both Testaments — though it is more prominent in the latter, since “life and immortality” have been brought into fuller view through the gospel of Christ (2 Timothy 1:10).

Daniel spoke of the resurrection of both the wicked and the faithful (Daniel 12:2), as did the Lord Jesus (John 5:28-29). Clearly, there is a destiny for both body and soul — hell for the wicked and heaven for the obedient (Matthew 10:28; 25:46; Mark 9:43-48).
There is a curious oddity in Hannover, Germany. A defiant atheist had his tomb covered with huge blocks of stone, bound with iron bands. There is this inscription: “This tomb is purchased for eternity; it will never be opened.”
Strangely, a poplar seed somehow was enclosed in the dark mold. Eventually, a mighty tree sprang up; it burst the bands asunder and moved the stones, as if waving leafy arms in defiance of the godless boast carved upon the marker. I have a photograph of this tomb with the protruding tree.
If a tiny seed can exert such force, think of the phenomenal demonstration, as the Creator of that seed demonstrates his power and all graves are opened.
We approach death with mixed emotions. We are grieved at the thought of leaving work undone and precious family behind.

On the other hand, for the child of God there is the tingling anticipation of being escorted by angels (Luke 16:22) into the blessed presence of Him who died for us, that we might be forever with the holy Godhead, the angels, the faithful of the ages, and our own loved ones who have died in Christ!


https://www.christiancourier.com/articles/1349-some-facts-about-death
Yes. Death is the release from the (hopefully old and spent) physical body.
 

JackDallas

Senator
Supporting Member
I'm an Evangelical preacher who has brought thousands to Christ, yes thousands, Jack, my clock never stopped. I'll see you in the kingdom, just look for a very bright light. We need to chat about your idea that politics come before your faith.
No man brings another person to Christ, not Billy Graham, not Dwight Moody, Rich Mullins or Don Francisco; only the Holy Spirit does that. The truly humble know that and admit it. You select and post many fine scriptures. I appreciate that. One of my favorites is Proverbs 27:2 KJV Let another man praise thee, and not thine own mouth; a stranger, and not thine own lips.
 
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